All The Dead are Holy / Larry Levy

Larry Levy

In this collection, not only are all the dead holy, but all the living as well, including “the one-legged veteran, the toddler with doll and comb.”  There are echoes of those who perished in the Holocaust and those still laboring to make a life in the modern American landscape.  In Levy’s tightly crafted poems, we glimpse what is both familiar and human:  teachers, immigrant brides, a lost father’s shirts and ties, the sidekick brother, the dying mother.  The message is clear and powerful:  “You must remember.”

— John Jeffire, author of Motown Burning and Shoveling Snow in a Snowstorm (Finishing Line, 2016)

Larry Levy is the best kind of writer.  His poems–with their honesty and intimacy–invite you in, ask you to sit at the table of his life, and listen to his heart tell you the stories that you need to hear about the past that is never past, the wars that will not end, the people who loved him and who continue to touch him even though they are gone.  Hearing his stories, you begin to wake to your own stories, your own losses and loves, and finally you want to take his hand and thank him for what he has given you.

— John Guzlowski, author of Echoes of Tattered Tongues (Aquina Polonica, 2016)

All The Dead Are Holy – it is, at once, a prayer, a history and a family album.  Levy unlocks secret passages into the past and unearths the artifacts of not just an extended family but whole generations of people doing their best to be who they are in a world that often wishes they were otherwise.  Delivered in skillfully wrapped packages of prosody, All the Dead Are Holy is a wide-awake walk down memory lane in the city of what it means to be fully human.

— JodiAnn Stevenson, author of The Procedure (March Street, 2006)
and Diving Headlong Into A Cliff Of Our Own Delusion (Saucebox Books, 2010)

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