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3rd Wednesday Blog

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Third Wednesday is a finely produced print journal that provides a quarterly outlet for both experienced and new writers and artists whose work deserves to be in print, publishing writers, poets and visual artists from all over the world.

Third Wednesday accepts submissions of poetry and prose through our Submittable account. We never charge submission or reading fees (except for contests) and registration at Submittable is free.

Scroll down to see some examples of the work we are publishing.

Self-publishers as Your Personal Printer

Well, you’ve got a book’s worth of poems and you’re not ready (so you think) to jump into the swamp of publishing or even to self-publish a book. What do you do with them? Maybe you just want to get them organized or you’d like to be able to finally show your poetry to friends or family but not put yourself out there to the general public. A self-publishing website like Lulu may be an answer.

Having your poems bound and printed is not the same as publishing. If you’ve written a lot, you’ve got poems in notebooks, journals and on scraps of paper shoved into drawers. If you’re the organized type, maybe you’ve even managed to put them together in a loose leaf binder. If you have, congratulations on at least getting that far, but it’s cumbersome to lug a binder around to open mics and other places you might want your poems at hand, and you probably have only that one precious copy. What if something awful were to happen to it or, worse, you should lose it?

Wouldn’t it be great if you had your poems in a small package with multiple copies so that you could always have them with you, would have copies to give away and so that you could never loose the only copy?

Most of the places we think of as self-publishing resources are little more than glorified, MyPoemshighly automated on-demand printers that can print and bind a 6 by 9 inch trade paperback for less than the cost you can print your poems at home, considering the high cost of ink cartridges. Assuming you do your own layout using the templates they provide, most such places can print a book of between 50 and 100 pages for around five or six dollars per copy and, for that price, you even get a glossy cover of your own design.

The example I cited, Lulu Publishing, has options for not assigning an ISBN code to your book and for archiving your book privately so that only you can order copies. There is no minimum number of copies when you do order, no “initial print run”. You’re free to order one copy, or two, or five, or ten.

The template handles the complications like setting margins, paginating, page numbering and even automates the table of contents as long as you follow the page by page instructions that are embedded in the template. There is a separate online cover design module that allows you to upload a cover photo if you want one and choose fonts, background colors and patterns. Once you’re satisfied with everything, your .docx file will be converted to the PDF file that the printer requires and you can download a copy that shows you exactly how the cover and the interior pages of your book will look.

Once you approve the PDF, it’s time to print. You’ll have a hard “proof copy” in about ten days. Once you approve that, you can order as many or as few copies as you want any time you want at a price you can afford.

– David Jibson, 3rd Wednesday Magazine

One Sentence Poetry Contest

Edition III of our One Sentence Poetry Contest is underway.  Winners of this popular contest will appear in the Summer Issue of the magazine in June.
SentenceDiagram

Poetry of a single sentence has a long history in literature.  John Keats’ Bright star, would I were steadfast, Ezra Pound’s In a Station of the Metro, William Carlos Williams’ The Red Wheelbarrow, Linda Paston’s The New Dog, to name a few.

The Simple Rules: Each poem should have a title and should consist of a single English sentence with conventional punctuation. There is no limit on length.

You may include up to 3 one sentence poems in your entry, which must be a single spaced .doc or .docx file. Do not include any identifying information within the body of the document. Multiple entries are allowed.

Open for entries from February 15th  to May 15th, 2019

The Money: $50 will be awarded to three winning poems. Our editors will also choose at least 10 additional entries for publication. Winners and all entries selected for publication will receive a print copy of the issue (an $11 value).

The entry fee of $5 must be paid via credit card or Pay Pal through Submittable. All entries will receive a PDF copy of the contest issue (a $5 value), so the net cost of your first entry is $ZERO.

submit

https://thirdwednesdaymagazine.submittable.com/submit

Djembefola, Song of the Mandinka

The Djembe is a rope-tuned skin-covered goblet drum from West Africa. The name derives from the phrase “Anke djé, anke bé”, “everyone gather together in peace” and defines the drum’s purpose. A Djembefola is an expert player.  Here’s a better expainationi from African poet, Aremu Adams.  It’s from the Spring issue ot 3rd Wednesday which will be in the mail to subscribers and contributors soon.

djembeAAdams