Big Changes for 3rd Wednesday

Since its founding 15 years ago 3rd Wednesday has been a quarterly literary and visual arts journal in print. For the first 12 of those it was available only in print to subscribers and contributors. Two years ago we started offering an electronic version of each issue free to anyone who wanted to read it. With that change, readership increased by nearly 1000%.

Now it’s time for the next step. With the Winter issue we become a true hybrid of electronic and print publishing. We have always operated by offering no-fee submissions on a rolling basis and will continue to do so, but in our new hybrid model we will publish accepted work online at the time of acceptance. This means our website will be continuously updated with new material and our print and electronic editions will be compendium of pieces selected over the previous quarter.

Entries in the annual fiction and poetry contests will, of course, be excepted from online publication prior to publication of the print edition of the magazines.

For contributors this means that published work will be immediately available to share with friends, family, through their social media platforms and author websites by using a link to the 3rd Wednesday website. This drives traffic to the website and, while guests may come to read a specific piece, many will stay to read another and perhaps another, leading them to download a free issue or two.

Be sure to follow our blog by email to recieve a notice each time a new piece is published.

Each accepted piece will appear on the website at the top of a menu on the right side of the screen. As new pieces are added, previous ones will move down one position on the menu. The most recent 10 posts will show on the menu and once a piece finally moves off of the front page menu, it will continue to be viewable by clicking on the 3W Blog button in the top menu of the home page. These posts are sortable by category to make posts easier to find.

The submission forms at Submittable now include a box for a 100 word 3rd person bio and an upload space for an author photo. Both are optional and will only be used on the website when provided.

Nothing will change in the number of pieces or way that pieces are selected. Publishing standards will not change.

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Wrinkles In Time and in Love / Nancy Jo Allen

allen_frontNancy Jo Allen proudly announces the release (March 20, 2021) of her first collection of poetry through her publisher Kelsay Books and Amazon. The book is entitled Wrinkles in Time and in Love, and includes the poem “Art” first published in Third Wednesday’s Vol.XI, No. 4 edition.

“Allen’s poems take us on a journey through the difficulties of relationship and identity: daughter, wife, mother, ex-wife, friend, and wife again. At each stage, we’re asked to reconsider our preconceptions and ideals in favor of the lived experience of those realities—a thoughtful and polished collection.”
—Marta Ferguson, former poetry editor for The Missouri Review, and author of Mustang Sally Pays Her Debt to Wilson Pickett

“Nancy Jo Allen’s poems are deeply felt and well crafted. She has an excellent ear and eye.”
—Bruce Taylor is the former Poet Laureate of Eau Claire and host of Off the Page a reading series at the Local Store Gallery.

“Like the haiku, Allen’s poetry captures small moments of life with images from nature. And like a haiku, the collection is perfect in word, rhythm, and line. Through her poems, we travel through the landscape of memory and vicariously touch grief and let it go. We recognize defeat and replace it with contentment. We love again.”
—Lori Younker, author of Mongolian Interior: An Expatriate Experience and Sioux Beside Me, former Columbia Chapter Missouri Writers Guild president, and author and founder of World So Bright.org, a collection of cultural essays.

Nancy Jo Allen was born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and now lives in Columbia, Missouri, with her husband Terry and their pup Jayden.
3WYouTube

Click to see a video recording of Nancy reading from Wrinkles in Time and in Love.

At the Driveway Guitar Sale/ Buff Whitman-Bradley

Cvr_DrivewayGuitarSaleThird Wednesday contributor Buff Whitman-Bradley’s new book, At the Driveway Guitar Sale: Poems on Aging, Memory, Mortality, is available from Main Street Rag Publishing Company. A few of the poems in the book were originally published in Third Wednesday. He podcasts at thirdactpoems.podbean.com
3WYouTube
Click the YouTube link for a video of Buff reading from his book.

At the Driveway Guitar Sale can be puchased from Main Street Rag.

I’ve read this author in many publications over the years, and listened to his own gently cadenced readings on his podcast, and I love his poetry. Wit, imagination, a perfect ear, and an effortless touch (not to mention knee-slapping punchlines) mark all of Whitman-Bradley’s work, and the poems in this book are no different. The poet is forgivingly and unforgivingly self-aware, somehow finding all the poetry in life’s least poetic moments.  ~Roger Stoll, essayist and poet

For all of us, even though we may continue to climb stairs and eat our vegetables, the ever-expanding past continues to nip at our heels. Buff Whitman-Bradley reminds us in these poems that we are not alone, that we participate in a common project with its pitfalls and distractions. He calls attention to the gifts and graces that accompany a seasoned perspective, and that there is a special liveliness and wise humor that comes with age that is both balm and elixir.  ~Gary Crounse

With his signature grace and economy, Buff Whitman-Bradley tackles the unimaginable; the body’s elemental breakdown and the proverbial leap into the unknown which awaits us all. Never settling for abstraction or platitude, these poems are as rugged and beautiful as the California landscapes humming in the background. And though he may have given up on his plan ‘to be an ancient Chinese poet’, something of their wild humor and gem-like clarity shines on every page. ~Seth Jani, Publisher and Editor of Seven CirclePress, Author of Night Fable

Tidy up

buff_whitman-bradleyA Zen master of my acquaintance
Once said that when he died
He wished to leave no trace.
All the backpackers I know
Say the same
About their sojourns in the wild.
No messes, no unfinished business.
It’s a good idea to tidy up
Before all of our little departures
And our impending Big One –
Douse the coals, strew the ashes,
Bag any food scraps,
Bits of paper, foil and cardboard,
Erase all footprints,
Be forthright, apologize, forgive –
So that what remains of us in memory
Is not a squalid little campsite
Full of trash and debris
And tangled disputes
That will cause great consternation
Or anguish
To those left behind,
But is instead
An expanse of mountain grasses
Beside a high cold tarn
Where ones who loved us
Might like to pass a little time,
Pitch a tent,
Build a fire.

Broken and Lost / Garrett Phelan

The object poem: Simple enough that we can teach grade school children to write them, complex enough that great poets write them. We think 3rd Wednesday’s poem of the week is a fine example of how much a good object poem can accomplish with a few lines – just look at that final question!

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What the Owls Know / Paul Bernstein

WhatTheOwlsKnowPaperback: 58 pages
Publisher: Kelsay Books (August 5, 2019)
Available from Kelsay Books
Amazon.com
Barnes and Noble

PaulBernsteinPaul Bernstein is a self-taught poet who began writing seriously after a varied career as a library worker/weekend hippie, anti-war activist, radical journalist, medical editor, and managing editor. His work now appears regularly in journals and anthologies. He is also a prizewinning amateur country music lyricist and a published photographer. Recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in  Front Porch Review, Muddy River Poetry Review, New Plains Review, Third Wednesday, and U.S. 1 Worksheets. Paul currently lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He suffers from an addiction to Michigan sports contracted as an undergraduate but is otherwise functional.

3WYouTubeClick to see and hear Paul Bernstein reading from What the Owls Know on our YouTube channel.